An orphan, a wombat sucks its thumb in the arms of its rescuer. The video goes around the world.

The rescue of an animal in danger always warms the heart, and this one is no exception to this rule, on the contrary. After being taken in by an Australian shelter, a young orphaned wombat snuggled into her rescuer’s arms…and sucked his thumb. Result, an incredibly moving video that goes around the world.

Image: To Sange Reserve

The photos were released on December 5 by Two Songs, a sanctuary specializing in the care of orphaned wild animals. The young wombat in question (named Summa) was taken in after his mother was killed. He was found alive in his mother’s pocket…

At the time he weighed less than a kilo, but since then everything is apparently fine. To be convinced, just take a look at this amazing video.

See:

This is Summa getting a hug while sucking her thumb… Summa is a southern hairy nose wombat who was orphaned when someone killed her mother. She came into care at TwoSongsSanctuary and weighs only 900 grams. Today she is very healthy and happy and living her best life surrounded by love and affection ❤️ She spends her days in an outdoor enclosure but comes inside at night as she is not yet old enough to be on her own all the time. Summa has 3 sister wombats to spend time with. ❤️bringing joy from South Australia

Posted by Two Songs Sanctuary on Monday, December 5, 2022

On Facebook, the refuge makes the presentations:

“This is Summa hugging herself while sucking her thumb…
Summa is a southern hairy wombat who was orphaned because someone killed his mother. She was picked up in TwoSongsSanctuary and weighed only 900 grams.
Today she is very healthy and happy to live her best life surrounded by love and affection. ❤️
She spends her days in an outdoor enclosure, but comes indoors at night as she is not yet old enough to be alone all the time. Summa has three wombat sisters to spend time with.”

Linda Davies, who works for Two Songs, confided in the magazine Newsweek :

“Baby wombats seem to have the world against them (…) Farmers consider them pests because they dig large burrows, including under crop fences (…) They are also hunted for their meat.”

Add to that the people who are hit by cars, and it is easy to understand why some little ones like Summa find themselves orphaned.

Unfortunately, Summa will never find its natural environment because, explains Linda Davies, “There is no room to release wombats as they are surrounded by industrial fields. If they were released, they would have little chance of survival.”

But for him, the main issue is probably somewhere else. He is safe, secure, pampered and visibly happy. So much the better.

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